Turin, Italy has all of the food, activities, events, shopping and history that you'd expect for a great vacation, without all of the crowds. View our City Guide by clicking the photo.

Turin, Italy has all of the food, activities, events, shopping and history that you'd expect for a great vacation, without all of the crowds. View our City Guide by clicking the photo.

Turin, Italy has all of the food, activities, events, shopping and history that you'd expect for a great vacation, without all of the crowds. View our City Guide by clicking the photo.

Turin, Italy has all of the food, activities, events, shopping and history that you'd expect for a great vacation, without all of the crowds. View our City Guide by clicking the photo.
This city has plenty of things to offer to the traveler who likes good food, great wines and a regal atmosphere. (Photo Credit: Noemi Nagy)

Why Turin?

You don’t have to be an Italophile to quickly fall in love with Turin – or, as it is sometimes affectionately called, “the Little Paris of Italy”. There’s the grandeur of architecture with the countless majestic avenues and arcaded streets. You’ll be charmed by the laid-back atmosphere of the city, as locals and tourists sip on the pre-dinner aperitivos on the piazzas. The amazing wines that one will always be served when dining out in Turin (Barolos, Barberas or Barbarescas  – take your pick!) will win you over. The list goes on and on and on…

When to Visit?

Turin has a sub-tropical climate: winters tend to be moderate and dry. Summer can get hot in the plains, but remain very mild in the hills. Spring and autumn might bring some rainfall, but these months can still prove to be a lovely time to visit.

If you’re unsure when to go, here are a couple of suggestions for some festivals that Turin has to offer throughout the year. They might help you with planning your trip.

  • The Turin Chocolate festival has been running for over 10 years now, and is usually held in late March.
  • The Kappa FuturFestival in the summer (8th-9th July), is one of the biggest house-and-techno festivals in Europe.
  • The Terra Madre food festival is an amazing event hosting workshops, dinner dates, cooking schools and much more. The next edition is planned for 2018 so keep your eye on their site.
  • For the movie buffs, the Torino Film festival (24th Nov – 2nd Dec) will be heaven on earth, with almost 10 days worth of international movies.

How do I get to Turin?

Turin airport (TRN) has good connection to most of the major airports across Europe and many of the other Italian cities as well. You can take a shuttle bus from the airport to the city center, which will cost you approximately 6.50 eur. Cabs are available, too, and cost between 30 and 50 eur, depending on your destination. The taxi trip will take around 30 minutes. If you would like to take a leisurely train ride between the major Italian cities, the times and costs will vary. A trip between Turin and Rome will take around 4.5 hours and costs between 50-80 eur,  between Turin and Milan is only a 1-hour ride costing 15-25 eur, while the Turin – Florence trip would take around 3 hours and cost between 25-50 eur.

Turin, Italy has all of the food, activities, events, shopping and history that you'd expect for a great vacation, without all of the crowds. View our City Guide by clicking the photo.
You don’t have to be an Italophile to quickly fall in love with these views. (Photo Credits: Noemi Nagy)

See it in Turin

Turin has been unfairly abandoned by foreign tourists who prefer to spend their time and money in cities such as Rome, Milan, Florence or Venice.  But this city has plenty of things to offer the traveler who likes good food, great wines, and a regal atmosphere.

If you want an amazing view of the city and the neighbouring Alps, and you don’t have a fear of heights, fly above the skyline with the Turin Eye.

Another great way to see the city from above is to visit the Mole Antonelliana, an amazing architectural symbol of Turin that’s over 160 meters high. It’s at the top of the building of the Cinema Museum, so it’s possible to visit both, but be prepared to queue for a while to get in.

Fans of the macabre and less touristy landmarks should head to the Cesare Lombroso’s Museum of Criminal Anthropology to learn more about the history of criminology in Italy and the psychology of criminals.

For local food and wine (and fruit and veg and pastries and chocolate and…and…and) visit the Mercato di Porta Palazzo, Europe’s largest (food) market with plenty of indoor and outdoor stalls.

If you’re in dire need of more retail therapy head to Via Garibaldi, a street that’s lined with small local shops for clothes, bags and shoes!

The original Fiat Factory factory was closed in 1982 and re-designed as a public space of concert halls, shops, a hotel, etc. While it is no longer serving its original purpose, it is still possible to visit the test track on top of the building. So you can let your inner petrol head go free!

Eat and Drink

For a quick and tasty lunch of amazing pastas head to Monegato Primi Secondi a Nessuno – Madama Cristina.

When in Turin you need to have an aperitivo before dinner. La Cuite is just the place for a lovely glass of pre-dinner drink and nibbles.

You can’t visit Italy without indulging in some gelato action – so don’t miss out on the amazing ice creams from Gelateria La Romana.

In case you’re craving something more than ‘just’ pizza or pasta, check out La Madama della Rocca. They serve heavenly local dishes such as the tagliatelle or tagliatellino with rabbit ragout, and a very nice glass of Barbera d`Asti.

Turin, Italy has all of the food, activities, events, shopping and history that you'd expect for a great vacation, without all of the crowds. View our City Guide by clicking the photo.
Among the delicious foods you’ll find here are the fabulous, homemade Italian cheeses. Food, glorious Italian food. (Photo Credit: Noemi Nagy)

Sleeping in Turin

One of the many advantages of Turin is that it hasn’t been overtaken by foreign tourists. Therefore, there are plenty of great accommodations across the city for a very reasonable price. Unless there is a popular event going on (see festivals above), you probably won’t need to book a hotel months in advance.

If you’d like to save on your stay to be able to spend more on your experience and souvenirs, make sure to book at the Star Residence Hotel. Staying in a two-person room will only set you back approximately 60 eur/night.

One of the most popular B&Bs in Turin is the B&B Torino Tres Chic, a truly ‘chic’ little hotel in the historical center of the city. If you’re visiting at peak tourist season, like July, a two-person room will cost around 90 eur.

For a more classy stay, book your accommodation at NH Torino Santo Stefano, where a room for two people will cost approximately 120 eur/night during the busy tourist season.

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Travel Tips and Local Blogs

If you need more convincing (do you, really?) to visit this wonderful Italian city, check out the these links for further information on food, sights and life in Turin.

Need more reasons to visit – say no more.

A blog by an Australian foodie mommy living in Turin – mmmmouthwatering…

Turin – through the eyes of a local.

Last Updated On: May 10th 2017

So now that you need to go to Turin, what do you want to do first?

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About Noémi Nagy

Noémi is a thirty-something Hungarian who moved to the Netherlands many moons ago but is still trying to get her head around the clogs, bikes and 'harings' . She considers herself adventurous when it comes to food and travel…although those who have seen her struggle with a haring/ stroopwafel/ stamppot might disagree. She loves trying out new restaurants and dishes and luckily the Hague has been a perfect playground for that.

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